Useful tools

Kadi CLI

The Kadi command line interface (CLI) contains various useful tools and utilities as part of mulitple subcommands and is available automatically after installing the package. An overview over all commands can be obtained by simply running:

kadi

The Kadi CLI ensures that each subcommand runs inside the context of the application, which is why it always needs access to the correct Kadi4Mat environment and, if applicable, configuration file. Please see the Kadi4Mat configuration section in the development installation instructions for a reminder. For this reason, some subcommands are simply wrappers over existing ones provided by other libraries, making their use in certain scenarios or environments easier. See also cli.

virtualenvwrapper

virtualenvwrapper is an extension to the Virtualenv tool and can be used to manage and switch between multiple virtual environments more easily. The tool can be installed globally via pip while not having any virtual environment currently active:

pip3 install virtualenvwrapper

Afterwards, some environment variables have to be set. Generally, a suitable place for them is the ~/.bashrc file. An example could look like the following:

export VIRTUALENVWRAPPER_PYTHON=/usr/bin/python3
export WORKON_HOME=${HOME}/.venvs
source ${HOME}/.local/bin/virtualenvwrapper.sh

Please refer to the official documentation about their meaning as well as other possible variables that can be used, as their values differ by system and personal preference.

EditorConfig

For general editor settings related to indentation, maximum line length and line endings, the settings in the .editorconfig file can be applied. This file can be used in combination with a text editor or IDE that supports it. For more information, take a look at the EditorConfig documentation.

pre-commit

pre-commit is a framework for managing and maintaining multi-language pre-commit hooks, which get executed each time git commit is run. The tool itself should be installed already. The hooks listed in .pre-commit-config.yaml can be installed by simply running:

pre-commit install

The hooks can also be run manually on all versioned and indexed files using:

pre-commit run -a

The versions of all hooks can be updated automatically by running:

pre-commit autoupdate

black

black is a code formatter which is used throughout all Python code in the project. The tool itself should be installed already and can be applied on one or multiple files using:

black <path>

Besides running black on the command line, there are also various integrations available for different text editors and IDEs. black is also part of the pre-commit hooks. As such, it will run automatically on each commit or when running the pre-commit hooks manually.

isort

isort is another kind of code formatter with focus on sorting and grouping import statements throughout all Python code in the project. The tool itself should be installed already and can be applied on one or multiple files using:

isort <path>

isort will automatically use the configuration specified in the [tool.isort] section inside pyproject.toml. Similar to black, various integrations are available for different text editors and IDEs. Furthermore, isort is part of the pre-commit hooks and will run automatically on each commit or when running the pre-commit hooks manually.

autoflake

autoflake is a tool mainly used to help with the common case of removing unused import statements. The tool itself should be installed already and can be applied on one or multiple files (via the -r flag) using:

autoflake -i -r <path>

autoflake will automatically use the configuration specified in the [tool.autoflake] section inside pyproject.toml. As it also is part of the pre-commit hooks, there is usually no need to run it manually. However, it may be necessary to exclude certain files or imports, which can be achieved with one of the options shown in the following example:

# autoflake: skip_file

import unused_import  # noqa

Pylint

Pylint is a static code analysis tool for Python and should already be installed as well. It can be used on the command line to aid with detecting some common programming or style mistakes, even if not using an IDE that already does that. For example, linting the whole kadi package can be done by running the following command:

pylint kadi

Pylint will automatically use the configuration specified in the [tool.pylint.*] sections inside pyproject.toml. Sometimes, there might be certain code that should never be checked for various things. Using specific comments, one can instruct Pylint to skip such code, e.g. the following line will not raise a message for an unused import statement:

import something  # pylint: disable=unused-import

ESLint

ESLint is a linter and basic code formatter which is used for all JavaScript code throughout the project, including any code snippets inside script tags and Vue.js components. It should be already installed and can be applied on the whole kadi folder using the eslint script exposed by the npm command. Note that npm needs access to the package.json file, see also the section about managing frontend dependencies.

npm run eslint kadi

The configuration of ESlint can be found inside package.json as well. Besides running ESlint on the command line, there are also various integrations available for different text editors and IDEs. Some files also contain code that should never be checked for certain things. Using specific comments again, one can instruct ESLint to skip such code, e.g. the following will suppress errors for unused variables in the specified function:

/* eslint-disable no-unused-vars */
function foo(a) {}
/* eslint-enable no-unused-vars */
// eslint-disable-next-line no-unused-vars
function foo(a) {}

ESLint is also part of the pre-commit hooks. As such, it will run automatically on each commit or when running the pre-commit hooks manually.